Round the Horne (Richmond Theatre)

This show is currently touring as the ’50th anniversary tour’ and if it isn’t quite as opulent and high-budget as the version which took up residence in the West End some years ago, it does include a number of spot-on impersonations of the cast of the much-loved radio programme – which you can hear for yourselves in repeats currently running on Radio 4 Extra.

roundthehorne

‘Round the Horne’ carried on from where ‘Beyond Our Ken’ left off, and had the deep-voiced Kenneth Horne as the master of ceremonies and participant in a range of songs, skits and characterisations in each half-hour show.  Douglas Smith was the announcer, with Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden and Kenneth Williams as the cast who gave us some memorable characters as Julian and Sandy, Dr Chu En Ginsberg, Seamus Android (a parody of Eamonn Andrews), Rambling Syd Rumpo, Fiona and Charrrrrrles, J Peasemould Gruntfruttock, and more.

Musical interludes included manglings of ‘I Remember It Well’ and ‘Poor Old Father’, while Douglas Smith, when not slipping in adverts for ‘Dobbieroids’ plays a life raft, a volcano, and other inanimate objects.  Horne is a spy in ‘The Man With The Golden Thunderball’ and Lord Horseposture in ‘The Admirable Loombucket’.  Paddick and Williams give us Shakespeare’s ‘Seven ages of man’ in Polari, and Betty Marsden shares her recipes to cook rhinoceros and yak.

It’s a tribute to the talented cast to say that at many points they do conjure up the actors they are playing.  Colin Elmer is especially good as Williams, whether singing about cordwangles or going off piste with the script in mock outrage, while Eve Winters is a glorious Marsden, whether throwing herself into the ‘I know you know’ routine or the ‘Many, many times’ in a shaking Thatcherite voice.  You may remember Marsden as Terry Scott’s bossy wife in “Carry On Camping” with the braying laugh.

Alex Scott Fairley is Paddick, Julian Howell McDowell is Horne, and Alan Booty is Smith, and all are excellent.  Miles Russell is the sound engineer who provides musical and effects accompaniment, and the cumulative effect is that of a true radio production back in time at the BBC.


She Loves Me (Menier Chocolate Factory)

shelovesmebanner

A delightful revival of the Sheldon Harnick and Jerry Bock musical is running on London’s fringe right now, and I heartily recommend it.

You might have come across this story before, in the films ‘The Shop Around The Corner’, ‘In The Good Old Summertime’ or ‘You’ve Got Mail’.  You might have seen the versions shown on television in 1978 and on digital live-streaming last year.

Georg Nowack (played at the performance I saw by understudy Peter Dukes, who was rather good, if a little plain) is an awkward bachelor who serves as one of the sales clerks in the perfumery of Mr Maraczek (Les Dennis, whose decision to use a truly awful accent colours his role) in 1930s Budapest.  He’s been corresponding with an unknown lady after placing an ad in the lonely hearts column, and he’s going to meet her soon for the first time.

she-loves-me-menier-207-700x455

Amalia Balash (a perky Scarlett Strallen, who steals the show with her “Vanilla Ice Cream”) comes to the shop for a job and instantly finds herself at odds with Nowack, and she is also corresponding with a ‘Dear Friend’ which we quickly find out, is her nemesis himself.  In the meantime, Ilona Ritter, a vision of bad hair dye and thick make-up (played with scene-stealing effervescence by Katherine Kingsley, who has a whole library of comic expressions and barely disguised malice) is dating smarmy cad and fellow shop-worker Steven Kodaly (Kingsley’s real-life spouse, Dominic Tighe, who is perfectly hissable) and watching her life slowly slip away.

The main cast is rounded out by Ladislav Sipos (Alastair Brookshaw, playing the twitchy family man who ‘never disagrees’, with aplomb) and a new discovery, Callum Howells as delivery boy Arpad Lazslow, whose “Try Me” is an Act 2 delight.  Norman Pace has joined the cast as Head Waiter, and he’s lots of fun in the restaurant scene, and surprisingly strong-voiced.  I also liked the couple who found romance through reading: “Victor!”  “Hugo!”

she-loves-me-7

For a fringe production in a small venue, a lot of thought has gone into the revolving sets and production design, and Paul Farnsworth definitely deserves praise for his sparkles, bright colours, and leaf/snow combination indicators of the change of the seasons.  Fine choreography too, and a more-than-decent house band give the fifty-something songs life and breadth (although the repetitive ‘Thank you madam’ refrains could easily be chopped after the first couple of times).  If only the wigs had looked a little more realistic, it would have been quite perfect; but this is a fun little confection that certainly raises a smile in this winter season.

‘She Loves Me’ continues at the Menier until the 4th March 2017.


Hedda Gabler (National Theatre)

Ibsen’s difficult late play comes to the National Theatre in a new version by Patrick Marber, directed by Ivo van Hove.  In a modern production, set in one white box, minimally furnished, and airless except for one window (adding to the oppression of the story), it begins with two figures already on stage, one sitting motionless on a chair to the side, and one playing the piano, occasionally flinging themselves forward on to the keys in frustration or despair.

hedda-gabler-main_hero-spot-sfw

The former is the maid, Berte (Éva Magyar), who throughout the play is present, seeing everything along with the audience, but ignoring all just as she is largely ignored.  The latter is the titular Hedda Gabler (Ruth Wilson), newly married to academic Dr Tesman (Kyle Soller, here using his American accent rather than the one we have grown used to in his appearances as the doomed Francis Poldark on television) but bored and without purpose.

“Academics are no fun!” she whines, and even stapleguns flowers to the walls when she is particularly fed up.  Not for this new bride the glow of happiness – even the expensive house she now lives in is theirs purely through a quirk of fate, a caprice that made Tesman think she had “set her heart on it.”  She is trapped in circumstances she is powerless to change, in a cage from which she can not break free.

For Tesman’s part he can’t believe his luck, not just that the General’s daughter has chosen him, but that he has “special access” to her body.  This makes him just as unsympathetic a character as their supposed friend, Brack (Rafe Spall) who is a smooth but repellent sexual predator who, in the final few scenes of the play, defiles and abuses Hedda in a most appalling and shocking way, helped by an inspired use of prop design to provide the gore often missing from this play.

heddagabler

Hedda Gabler is a proud woman, but not in any way a nice one.  She torments her school friend, Mrs Elsted (Sinéad Matthews) and ruins her life, under the cloak of supposed kindness.  She goads the weak-willed career rival of her husband’s, Lovborg, her former lover, into desolation and destruction while fantasizing of the beauty of his “wearing vine leaves in his hair”.  She lies, cheats, manipulates, and destroys.  She is a viper in her words, too, hurting the kindly but interfering Tesman aunt (Kate Duchêne), and pushing away her devoted husband.

This production may rely too much on musical interludes (‘Blue’ by Joni Mitchell appears several times, and ‘Hallelujah’ the Leonard Cohen song, as rendered by Jeff Buckley – but clumsily edited – cuts into one scene), but its sparseness and the decision to stage much of the action on the fringes of the stage worked well for me, as it forces the eye to follow the characters as they separate or interact.  Entrances and exits are blurred, so we end up unsure as to the proportions of the room(s) we are viewing.  A video entry phone is the only concession to technology.

Marber’s adaptation may bring more laughs to the fore than the piece requires, but there is no denying the cumulative power of script, direction, and performance.  Wilson, Soller, Spall and Matthews are all excellent, with only Chukwudi Iwuji’s Lovborg missing that final note of mental disintegration that his fate would seemingly require.   Hedda’s final act may shock some, “People do not do such things”, but at least the events of this production are delivered in such a way that she clearly does not have a choice if she is not to spend her days in a living hell.

Image credit: Jan Versweyveld.


A Christmas Carol (Arts Theatre)

Just outside of the festive season a trip to see a retelling of the Dickens classic was in order, although when I say ‘classic’ I was amused to hear one person behind me having the whole story explained to them before the show started.

A one-man show, with Simon Callow in fine feckle as the grumpy and avericious old Scrooge, also essaying at various points the entire Cratchit family, the old Fezziwigs dancing, the jovial nephew Fred, the fat merchants, the spirits, and more.

The story may be familiar but this version has humour and effective simplicity in its sets (a solitary candle, some chairs, clever lighting, a screen, and a handful of props and ideas from a snowy street to an open window).  The power of suggestion comes from Callow’s gift as a storyteller, and this is a lovely festive piece of theatre.

Last performances today.


Katherine Jenkins (Barbican Centre)

This was the last date of Katherine Jenkins’ ‘Celebration’ tour, but with the Christmas carols dropped and a new guest performer in John Owen-Jones.

I am not much of a fan of Jenkins and her light classical crossover warbling, although taken purely as an entertainment her show certainly seems to please her hardcore fans of men of a certain age and their wives.

‘Santa Baby’ added a sprinkle of fun, and three dress changes and a crystal encrusted microphone gave a dash of glamour: there was strong accompaniment from the London Concert Orchestra conducted by Anthony Inglis (Die Fledermaus and Sleigh Bells opening both halves of the show).

In anticipation of the upcoming ENO production of ‘Carousel’ in which Jenkins makes her musical theatre debut in April, she treated us to a stirring ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’, while more traditional repertoire included an Italian translation of Dolly Parton’s ‘I Will Always Love You’ and ‘Sanctus’ (to the melody of Elgar’s Nimrod).

John Owen-Jones is always a solid proposition, having served long stints in the musicals ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ and ‘Les Miserables’, and we heard a song from each plus one from the underrated ‘Love Never Dies’, the lovely ‘Maria’ from ‘West Side Story’, one from ‘Miss Saigon’ (with a slight lyric fluff), and even the Eurovision winner from Conchita Wurst a couple of years ago, ‘Rise Like a Phoenix’.  

A duet of ‘Barcelona’ with Jenkins didn’t really work though, and she shone most convincingly in anthems like ‘Amazing Grace’ and ‘How Great Thou Art’.


The Dresser (Duke of York’s)

Ronald Harwood’s play, inspired in part by his own experience as dresser to the actor-manager Donald Wolfit, creaks a little these days but this is still a very enjoyable revival.

dresser

‘Sir’ is the leading man in a touring company (‘next week, God willing, we will be in Eastbourne’), who, along with his ‘lady wife’, presents Shakespeare in a haphazard way to an audience who are probably as bored with the proceedings as those in the company (‘cripples, old men, and nancy boys’).  In this version of the play Sir is portrayed by Ken Stott, and at first I thought he was a little miscast, but as the play progressed he grew into the role and by the end was really rather effective.

In the main role of Norman, the dresser, Reece Shearsmith is wonderfully waspish and camp as the man who has been responsible for the cheering up of his charge and the ‘washing of his foul underpants’ for some sixteen years.  This man sees the lie of the land and realises that the game is up, and yet he still has to play-act just as much as those on stage.  His timing is faultless and his acting cuts straight to the heart, whether making us laugh with his constant refrain of ‘I had a friend’, or touching us with his final scenes of loneliness and desperation.

dresser2

Supporting roles go to Simon Rouse, as the doddery Thornton, who for years has soldiered on in the smallest of parts, but tonight has to play the Fool; Harriet Thorpe as Her Ladyship, now too old to care anything for her career or her sham marriage; and Selina Cadell as the quietly devoted but steely stage manager Madge.

I would like to give a nod to the set and staging too, Simon Higlett’s revolving backstage and wings, and Sean Foley’s direction, which is spot on, whether in the intimate two-handed scenes between Stott and Shearsmith, or the amusing opening of ‘King Lear’ (‘methinks I saw the King’) or the later storm, requiring all hands on deck.  In fact, Lear is the perfect depiction of the backstage drama, too, with Norman as the Fool, who although ever present, finds he has ‘slipped out of sight’ when he reads Sir’s book dedication.


Deep Purple studio albums revisited – part two

Following on from part one, which dealt with the output of Deep Purple pre-split, this post will look at their reunion albums up to and including Purpendicular.  This means the most recent four albums are missing, but I no longer actively follow that line-up of the band and it would be wrong of me to comment on something in which I had no interest!

Mark Five (Mark Two, rebooted)

  • Vocals – Ian Gillan
  • Guitar – Ritchie Blackmore
  • Bass – Roger Glover
  • Keyboards – Jon Lord
  • Drums – Ian Paice

This definitive line-up returned in 1984 with one of the best rock records ever made, which still stands up today.  Then a mis-step towards commerciality and another breakup caused the band’s musical style to waver, before a final catastrophic collapse in 1993.

The albums

‘Perfect Strangers’, released October 1984

  • Knocking at Your Back Door
  • Under The Gun
  • Nobody’s Home
  • Mean Streak
  • Perfect Strangers
  • A Gypsy’s Kiss
  • Wasted Sunsets
  • Hungry Daze
  • Not Responsible (cassette and CD only)

High point: there are so many, with hardly a dud throughout the album.  But if pushed, the beautiful ‘Wasted Sunsets’.

Low point: A Gypsy’s Kiss is probably the one I listen to least of this set.

Marks out of five: five.

‘The House of Blue Light’, released January 1987

  • Bad Attitude
  • The Unwritten Law
  • Call of the Wild
  • Mad Dog
  • Black and White
  • Hard Lovin’ Woman
  • The Spanish Archer
  • Strangeways
  • Mitzi Dupree
  • Dead or Alive

High point: it’s a strange album which is far too geared to the idea of the ‘radio play’ single.  But I love the organ bits on Bad Attitude.

Low point: Black and White is pretty unmemorable.

Marks out of five: two.

Mark Six

  • Vocals – Joe Lynn Turner
  • Guitar – Ritchie Blackmore 
  • Bass – Roger Glover 
  • Keyboards – Jon Lord 
  • Drums – Ian Paice 

Ian Gillan’s departure from the band brought former Rainbow singer Joe Lynn Turner back to be reunited with former colleagues Blackmore and Glover, with a new slick sound for the band.  Sadly after one excellent album and tour this association came to an end.

Album:

‘Slaves and Masters’, released October 1990

  • King of Dreams
  • The Cut Runs Deep
  • Fire in the Basement
  • Truth Hurts
  • Breakfast in Bed
  • Love Conquers All
  • Fortuneteller 
  • Too Much is Not Enough
  • Wicked Ways

High point: Fortuneteller is worth a couple of minutes of anyone’s time.

Low point: I like Too Much is Not Enough, but it isn’t a Deep Purple song.

Marks out of five: five

Mark Seven (another reboot for Mark Two)

This reunion was a mistake and the resulting album does not stand up well today. Perhaps it is a conflict of styles. But its dated rock sounds and pretty dreadful lyrics have killed it.

Album:

‘The Battle Rages On’, released July 1993

  • The Battle Rages On
  • Lick it Up
  • Any
  • Talk About Love
  • Time to Kill
  • Ramshackle Man
  • A Twist in the Tale 
  • One Man’s Meat
  • Solitaire 

High point: I love Solitaire.  But Ramshackle Man is almost back to Purple at their finest.

Low point: One Man’s Meat and Lick it Up suffer from really childish lyrics.

Marks out of five: three

Mark Eight

  • Vocals – Ian Gillan
  • Guitar – Steve Morse
  • Bass – Roger Glover
  • Keyboards – Jon Lord 
  • Drums – Ian Paice 

After the 1993 tour conflict reared its head in the band and for whatever reason,.Ritchie Blackmore departed to reform Rainbow.  The new album was an odd mix of material which could have been on any earlier album plus new songs which were a stylistic departure.

The only album I will comment on is their first.

Album:

‘Purpendicular’, released February 1996

  • Vavoom: Ted the Mechanic
  • Loosen My Strings
  • Soon Forgotten
  • Sometimes I Feel Like Screaming
  • Cascades: I’m Not Your Lover
  • The Aviator
  • Rosa’s Cantina
  • A Castle Full of Rascals
  • A Touch Away

High point: A Touch Away and Sometimes I Feel Like Screaming are good songs

Low point: Ted the Mechanic.  The lyrics are awful. 

Marks out of five: one.


The Human League (Royal Festival Hall)

I’ve been a fan of The Human League since the early 80s: not their Don’t You Want Me phase as I was only nine years old then, but not that long after when The Lebanon was in the charts in Spring 1984.  Quite soon after like many other teenagers I sang along to the whole of ‘Dare’ on cassette in my bedroom many, many times; I had posters of the band on my wall; and loved their big selling singles Louise and Human.

hlthree

I lost them around the time the 90s hit, but eventually came back and now, finally, have seen them live, so it’s been a long wait.

As with anything else which teeters on the ‘nostalgia’ tag (although I know they hate that and they haven’t really, technically, been away) you never know what you are going to get, but the moment the set appeared with the pulsing beat of the opening song, Being Boiled (a showcase for Phil Oakey alone, as it dates from the days of The Human League #1, when they were a kind of Yorkshire Kraftwerk electro outfit) and the video projections kicked into life, I knew we were in for something special.

Watch a bit of ‘Seconds’

hlsix

The songs from ‘Dare’ were liberally sprinkled through this set: The Sound of the Crowd, Seconds, Open Your Heart, Love Action, The Things That Dreams Are Made Of.  There were those big singles I loved, too, plus Mirror Man (which I had forgotten, not having heard in years) and, of course, Don’t You Want Me, with the neat conceit of having one of the backing band playing an instrumental introduction of it which just got the crowd more fired up.

hltwo

Joanne Catherall and Susan Ann Sulley are the decorative side of the band, and an integral part of their trademark sound, and they were showcased well on their own with One Man In My Heart as well as (particularly Susan) providing energy to keep the audience going throughout.  Their costume changes were slightly exceeded by the parade of Phil’s designer wardrobe, but it all adds to the spectacle.

hlfive

Can I just pause to say how fantastic Phil Oakey’s voice still is?  It’s been said in some quarters that he isn’t one of the best popular vocalists, but I have to disagree: he has such a recognisable vocal style that fits the band’s songs perfectly; and I was so pleased that we got to close with Together In Electric Dreams, a song which I have always loved, even if the film it was written for is now hopelessly outdated.

hlone

Now slightly north of 60 years old this singer has unbounded energy and enthusiasm, and he is a total showman.  It is always a pleasure to see an act coming across so professionally, and The Human League are one of the most professional and accomplished acts I have seen.  Compare last night’s work with something way back like The Path of Least Resistance from nearly forty years ago and the look may be different (a sleeker hairline these days, but that’s no bad thing) but the voice hasn’t changed much.

hleight

I haven’t danced so much in years, and loved every minute.  How could I have waited so long?  My husband (not really a fan) enjoyed himself too, and yes, first thing we did on the way home was order a CD copy of ‘Dare’ to replace that tired out 80s cassette!

hlfour

I wanted to give a nod to London band Ekkoes who were the support act, right at the start of their career.  Their cover of the late Laura Branigan’s Self Control was excellent and I liked their own song Last Breath as well.  I hope they go places and it was a bonus to see them, even if I would have rather liked (for 80s nostalgia again) to see Blancmange, who are doing some of the other dates on the tour as support.

You can investigate Ekkoes a bit more at http://ekkoes.com/.

Here’s the twenty song setlist from The Human League: Being Boiled, The Sound of the Crowd, Sky, Heart Like a Wheel, Filling Up With Heaven, Open Your Heart, Soundtrack to a Generation, Seconds, The Lebanon, One Man In My Heart, Human, Louise, Stay With Me Tonight, Love Action, Tell Me When, Keep Feeling (Fascination), Mirror Man, Don’t You Want Me, The Things That Dreams Are Made Of, Together in Electric Dreams.

hlseven

Photographs taken by Louise Penn and Colin Penn.  Video clip by Louise Penn.

 

 


Remember the Night, 1940 – ★★★★

Everybody’s favourite Stanwyck (to Letterboxders, anyway), and one I hadn’t seen until today. Putting aside the fact that bits of it remind me of ‘The 39 Steps’, others of ‘Susan Slept Here’ and others of ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ and ‘Mr Deeds Goes To Town’, I have to add my praise to that of the general majority.

Barbara Stanwyck is Lee, a jewel thief (must be something in the air, as yesterday I was watching a film with Myrna Loy in a similar profession), and here she is teamed for the first time of three with Fred MacMurray, here playing a prosecuting attorney, John, who succeeds in getting her trial postponed for decision til after Christmas, and ends up taking custody of her over the festive season instead.

MacMurray isn’t one of my favourite actors, but he’s very good here, and Stanwyck is in good form as the career criminal who opens proceedings in the court by watching her defence lawyer with barely-disguised amusement.

She’s no victim here, and in fact she is perhaps better than she was in femme fatale mode in ‘Double Indemnity’. Her gift for fun eventually paid off as Preston Sturges, screenwriter here, went on to write and direct ‘The Lady Eve’ for her, which gave her a chance to broaden her range.

Willard Robertson’s speech as the flowery defence chap is hilarious, and even more so when you note in real life he gave up a career in law for the stage. Sterling Holloway, always fabulous, and with the weirdly musical voice, is fun as a cousin of MacMurray’s. ‘Snowflake’ Toones plays John’s slightly slow servant but he isn’t quite as daft as he first appears. And Beulah Bondi ages up yet again to play MacMurray’s mother.

This is a romance, a festive one, and a courtroom drama, and succeeds at all of them. What a happy discovery!

Vía Letterboxd – loureviews


Whipsaw, 1935 – ★★★½

Spencer Tracy had switched studios from Fox to MGM in 1935, and this role has more in common with his tough guy programmers than the more sophisticated fare his new studio would eventually offer him.

This is a fairly minor crime picture but it’s lifted by the sparkling chemistry between Tracy (as a G-man posing as a crook) and Myrna Lou (as a hard-boiled jewel thief). They positively crackle in their scenes together, which makes this film a pleasure to watch.

Director Sam Wood is content to let his stars just do their thing, and they do it well. Romance beckons by the halfway point, and the whole story of the stolen pearls sinks into second place.

A happy discovery, currently available on YouTube.

Vía Letterboxd – loureviews


King Lear (Barbican)

My second Lear of this month is rather more traditional and definitely much safer than the one over at the Old Vic.

Another collaboration from RSC power couple Antony Sher and Gregory Doran, this Lear is opulent, regal, but, except for David Troughton’s magnificent Gloucester and Natalie Simpson’s sweet Cordelia, the play is strangely unmoving.

A very lengthy opening scene has the displaced and homeless sitting on the stage until they are rudely scattered ready for the entrance of the king, a Sher hunched up and swathed in furs, with a rasping voice.  He appears behind glass which is slowly lowered to reveal the full majesty.

He gives away his kingdom to the empty flattery of his daughters, who clearly loathe him (later, each will recoil from his offered embrace), and in a first display of a mind in disorder, disowns his ‘joy’, Cordelia, cast adrift in her bridal gown to be taken up by a sympathetic King of France.

Antony Byrne portrays Kent and in disguise, particularly, as a tattooed skinhead, he excels, and his final scene is well played.  Graham Turner plays a Fool first confident, funny and chatty, but eventually bewildered in the eye of the storm.  We do not see him in the second half, as is usual, but we are concerned for his survival.

As the brothers who war due to the one’s legitimacy and the other’s bastardy, Paapa Essiedu was not convincing for me due to his total sarcasm for all around him and his throwaway asides; better was Oliver Johnstone’s Edgar who went from a bookish fop through impersonation as Poor Tom to sword-wielding champion with ease.

The relationship between Regan (Kelly Williams) and Cornwall (James Clyde) is presented very much as one orchestrated by her (when he is mortally wounded and asks for her hand, she coldly walks away without a glance).  I much preferred Nia Gwynne’s Goneril, a lady with pure ice in her veins.

The eye-gouging scene may be misjudged – I had trouble hearing lines spoken within the perspex box from the stalls, so I feel for the gallery – but the effect is probably on a par with the thrown eyeball over at the Old Vic.

Where this production misses for me is the final mental disintegration of Lear.  I was not moved either by his recognition of Cordelia or his ‘howl, howl’ at her death.  And I know Sher has the emotional pull in other roles (his superb Willy Loman, for example, so this was a surprise).

I am glad to have had the opportunity to see both London Lears at such close proximity, and both have much to recommend them.  So see both if you can, but you have to move quick to see Glenda Jackson in the role (to December 3rd).

The RSC King Lear continues at the Barbican until December 23rd.


Some words about Leonard Cohen

So Laughing Leonard has left the table, stepped down from the bar, tipped his hat for the last time, and gone on his final journey.

cohen-1

Lots will be said about Leonard Cohen today.  How a poet and a visionary became a powerful singer-songwriter, a mirror for the times, a prism for words of passion, politics, religion and, yes, that thing we all struggle with and call life.

His story is well known. At 33 he was signed to Columbia despite their reservations and over the next half a century he has introduced fourteen studio albums of his songs and spoken words of wisdom to the world; the last, ‘You Want It Darker’, just a few weeks ago.

Although I’m not a long-term fan right from the beginning, I can pinpoint exactly when I was first aware of Cohen, and it was with his appearance on ‘Later … with Jools Holland’ on 14 May 1993.  

His album ‘The Future’ had not long been released, and although some observers claim this was blighted by doom and depression, it contained some uplifting songs such as ‘Closing Time’ together with the cynicism of ‘Democracy’.

cohen-2

Cohen was a dabbler, a self-confessed ‘lazy bastard living in a suit’ (‘Going Home’), shy of commitment, he never married but has left two children, Adam and Lorca, his son having acted as producer and sometime co-writer on the last album.  Women have always been his muses: Marianne Ihlen, Suzanne Elrod, Suzanne Verdal, Rebecca De Morney, Anjali Thomas, Joni Mitchell, Janis Joplin.

His lyrics, always precise and deftly honed, have been sensual and sometimes strongly sexual (‘remember when I moved in you / and the Holy Dove was moving too’: ‘Hallelujah’; ‘there’s blood on every bracelet / you can see it, you can taste it / and it’s Please baby please baby please’: ‘Light as the Breeze’), and always linger, with meaning in the memory.

cohen-3

Some samples of his work:

The Maestro says it’s Mozart / but it sounds like bubble gum (‘Waiting for the Miracle’)

You who build these altars now / To sacrifice these children / You must not do it anymore (‘The Story of Isaac’)

I struggled with some demons / They were middle class and tame / I didn’t know I had permission to murder and to maim (‘You Want It Darker’)

Everybody knows you’ve been discreet / But there were so many people you just had to meet / Without your clothes (‘Everybody Knows’)

I said to Hank Williams, how lonely does it get? / Hank Williams hasn’t answered yet
But I hear him coughing all night long (‘Tower of Song’)

cohen-4

And draw us near / And bind us tight / All your children here / In their rags of light (‘If It Be Your Will’)

Yes, and thanks, for the trouble you took from her eyes / I thought it was there for good so I never tried (‘Famous Blue Raincoat’)

Touch me with your naked hand / Touch me with your glove (‘Dance Me To The End of Love’)

Please walk by me again / With a drink in your hand / And your legs all white / From the winter (‘Dear Heather’)

And sometimes when the night is slow / The wretched and the meek / We gather up our hearts and go (‘A Thousand Kisses Deep’)

We will not see his like again.  Go in peace on your final journey, Mr Cohen.

cohen-5

 


King Lear (Old Vic)

November 2016 will be topped and tailed for me by two new productions of Shakespeare’s ‘King Lear’, and this first one is a rather significant one, as it represents the return to the stage of Glenda Jackson after her quarter of a century career change to represent Hampstead and Highgate (later Kilburn) in Parliament.

jacksonlear2

The Old Vic is not the most obvious venue for a modern dress, Brechtian, Lear, with its Victorian proscenium – however, director Deborah Warner and her co-designer Jean Kalman have created a staging which at first looks as if might use the whole stage space (it is fully opened out and set with movable walls, screens, and plastic chairs on which some of the cast sit and chat before the action starts).  In fact most scenes are staged on the front of the stage, which projects into the auditorium necessitating the removal of the first few rows of the stalls.

So, a minimal set and staging (and each scene number projected on to the screens or on top of the proscenium – perhaps to assist those new to the play to stay engaged throughout its mammoth running time; 3 hrs 35 on the final preview on Thursday), and modern costumes.  Jane Horrocks’ toxic Regan wears killer black heels; Rhys Ifans’ Fool is dressed as Superman and in one scene dons a scary clown’s mask; Karl Johnson’s Gloucester wears jeans.

jacksonlear

Glenda Jackson plays the King, and although there is no gender impersonation here, she dons androgynous blacks and reds and has her hair in a short and severe style.  Her authority effortlessly commands the stage in her first appearance, in which her love for Morfydd Clark’s sweet Cordelia (they arrive hand in hand) curdles so quickly to rage you almost have sympathy for Regan and Goneril (a steely Celia Imrie), having to cope with so changeable and terrifying a parent.  She displays a sarcastic vein of humour too, in the ‘crawl towards death’ line, and later, in her interplay with the Fool’ and she handles the storm scenes well in flowing shirt and long socks, in despairing, shattered senility.

Johnson’s Gloucester elicits sympathy as he appears less of a statesman and more of a meddling Polonius-type, and although some of the audience seemed to find his ‘I have no eyes’ line amusing, it was deeply felt and beautifully delivered.  As the bad son, Edmond, Simon Manyonda first appears doing an exhausting workout with skipping rope and press-ups, before dismissing his doting brother Edgar by mooning the audience.  He is a studious and serious traitor, colluding with those watching from the dark and mocking the two daughters who, barren and frigid in their respective marriages, salivate over him.

Edgar, played by Harry Melling, is good in the Poor Tom scenes (curiously by the time we get to the ‘naked fellow’ lines he is clothed, but he does disrobe completely earlier on), although he overdoes the speech stating his father’s ‘heart burst’, striking his chest repeatedly in the echo of a heartbeat.  I note he is one of the Troughton acting family as well as a Harry Potter alumnus, and can see some of his family potential (his uncle David is soon over at the Barbican in the second November Lear I mentioned earlier, playing Gloucester).

Rounding out the cast are Danny Webb as a psychotic Cornwall, all smiles before the steel temper strikes (the blinding of Gloucester is done well, with suggestive shadows and piercing Regan scream); William Chubb as a sympathetic Albany, trapped in a marriage which has decayed for years; Gary Sefton as an ingratiating Oswald; and Sargon Yelda as a strangely young and vital Kent.   The scene where the King of France accepts a dowerless Cordelia is somewhat spoilt by his comic accent, but that’s a small criticism.

jacksonlear3

This is Glenda Jackson’s moment, though, and she surely shines.  Her interplay with her fellow cast is convincing – in particular with Ifans’ Fool, Yelda’s disguised Kent (and earlier, in his banishment scene), and her daughters.  Her ‘howl, howl’ as she is dragged in on a carpet with her deceased young daughter is heart-rending, and her refusal of Gloucester’s request to kiss her hand ‘let me wipe it first; it smells of mortality’ is nicely done, as is her recognition of him despite her previous staggering madness with leafed crown.

A nod, too, for the design of the storm, with projections, sound, and large black plastic sheet simply shaken.  The effect is spectacular.

Photos by Manuel Harlan.  King Lear runs at the Old Vic until the 3rd December.  Book tickets at http://www.oldvictheatre.com/whats-on/2016/king-lear/.


Michael Clark Company (Barbican Centre)

Michael Clark used to be the enfant terrible of modern dance, whether dancing with The Fall in trousers with the seat missing, cavorting around with Leigh Bowery, or producing, now and again, really superior pieces of work such as ‘O’, ‘Mmm’, and fun pieces such as ‘Because We Must’.

clarkbarbican

Now, at 54 years of age, his company returns to the Barbican with a new show called to a simple, rock ‘n’ roll … song.    These days Clark is much more mainstream, settled with a partner who is as much part of the establishment as he is (Stefan Kalmar, who runs the ICA), and with this show, he offers a sad but powerful goodbye to David Bowie – even appearing briefly himself (knowingly, ending prone on the floor) during a routine set to ‘Blackstar’, a fun piece with Patti Smith music, and a fusion of sound and movement to the music of Erik Satie.

It’s good to see him back and at the top of his artistic powers, creating something which is still sexy, still punchy, still just a little bit subversive.  Although age and injury has stopped him dancing into his later years, he still has a stage presence which draws the eye, and in his company he has a number of performers we can watch for the future, especially Harry Alexander, tall, lithe and graceful.


Archive TV rediscoveries

It’s been an exciting few days over at Kaleidoscope, based in Birmingham, as a seemingly endless run of archive television goodies have been announced which were previously missing, believed wiped.

Mostly from one individual collector (!), here’s a quick highlights run down of what episodes and items have been returned to the rights holders:

zcars

Z-Cars.  Two episodes of the gritty police series; Affray and Family Feud, both from 1962.  This brings the survival rate of the first series to nineteen episodes out of thirty-one made.  The early episodes I have seen have been very watchable – although only colour episodes from the later years have so far been made available on DVD, by Acorn.

avengers

The Avengers.  Another episode from the underrated Ian Hendry years, series 1’s Tunnel of Fear, from 1961.  One of my number one ‘wants’ so, yes, delighted!  This increases the survival rate of the first series to three and a half episodes from the twenty-six made.  Before Steed became the lead character with a feisty female sidekick, he was the companion to the decent Dr Keel, and the early extant episodes have quite a different feel to the classic series we know today.

drfinlay

Dr Finlay’s CasebookA Questionable Practice, from 1963.  Many of the surviving early episodes have made it on to DVD, from Simply, and I hope this joins them soon.  A very enjoyable series, which benefits from the excellent casting of Bill Simpson, Andrew Cruickshank and Barbara Mullen. .This recovery means there are now seventy episodes available from a hundred and ninety-one made.

softly

Softly, SoftlyTalk to Me, from 1966.  The pilot episode of the much-loved sequel to Z-Cars, and a very interesting survival.

wooster

The World of WoosterJeeves and the Great Sermon Handicap, from 1965.  This means there are now two surviving episodes from the five seasons which featured Dennis Price and Ian Carmichael as the silly ass and his superior butler.  I have heard very positive things about this series and can’t wait to see this episode.

hugh

Hugh and IBeau Jesters, from 1966.  A series probably best known as ‘that dreadful series’ David Croft was involved with prior to Dad’s Army, featuring Hugh Lloyd and Terry Scott.  Still, it has its fans, and it is always nice to welcome archive comedy back to the fold.  This means twenty-five episodes now exist from an estimated sixty-nine made.

harry

Here’s HarryThe Musician, from 1963.  The surviving edition from series six of Harry Worth’s show, and notorious in its way for being one of the few programmes not pulled from the schedule on the occasion of President Kennedy’s assassination.

celebrate

This is very much a time for celebration!

Tunnel of Fear is being shown at the next Kaleidoscope event in Birmingham on the 12th November (sadly now sold out).

Family Feud and Jeeves are being shown at the BFI Southbank’s Missing Believed Wiped event in December (exact date to be confirmed).

Welcome back, all.

 


Whistle Down the Wind, 1961 – ★★★★★

“I said yeah. You’ll hear about me again.”

I gave this just shy of a five star score last time, but now I can’t find any fault with this film.

Fourteen-year-old Hayley Mills is absolutely superb as the girl who thinks she has discovered Jesus living in her barn, and Alan Bates (in his first starring role) matches her scene for scene as the convict whose desperation, fatigue and confusion leads him to play the part she has created for him.

The joy of this film is the simple allegory about Christianity and the evolution of the young girl who finds herself attached to the mysterious man, and the huge group of children who become his followers.

Filmed in Clitheroe and Burnley in Lancashire, largely using local children, this showcases the performance of young Alan Barnes as Charlie, who brings an innocent and deadpan humour to the situation.

Magical, moving, and just as relevant to an audience of adults as it is to children (I first saw it aged about eight, and I’m watching it now more than thirty years later), this is one of Brian Forbes’ best films, beautifully directed and photographed.

This is a film which gives back more with each viewing. Quite simply one of the perfect examples of British cinema of the 1960s.

Vía Letterboxd – loureviews


No Man’s Land (Wyndham’s Theatre)

nomansland

One of theatre’s current hot tickets is Sean Mathias’ production of Harold Pinter’s ‘No Man’s Land’, which is running at the Wyndham’s.

It stars Ian McKellen as Spooner and Patrick Stewart as Hirst, in the roles originated forty-one years ago by John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson.  Named after turn of the century cricketers (as are the supporting characters in this play, Briggs – played by Owen Teale – and Foster – played by Damien Molony), these elderly gentlemen are first introduced to us in Hirst’s opulent drinking den, knocking back neat whisky ‘as it is, absolutely as it is’ and sparring with words.

Hirst is the Yorkshireman made good, the working man who has become an accepted member of the literati, while the Lancastrian Spooner has a cultural background but is reduced to collecting beer mats in a seedy pub.  Hirst has a young, leather-jacketed housekeeper, Foster, and a bruising butler/cook, Briggs, who has a beautiful speech in act two about ‘Bolsover Street’.

McKellen’s reactions are, of course, priceless throughout, and he clearly relishes the comment about ‘consuming the male member’, while Stewart is in command on Pinter’s pauses and inflections throughout: making them a formidable team.  They also imbibe a lot of liquid refreshment in act one (which perhaps makes an interval necessary in an 100 minute play), while McKellen relishes a scrambled egg and bread breakfast in act two.

With Pinter, there are no real answers to what his plays are about.  They pinpoint the human condition, the intrusion of strangers, the faultiness of memories, the pointlessness of life.  Every word is weighted, every move is choreographed, the set is minimalist (chairs, a bar, a window, a light, and video projection which makes the trees at the top of the set appear to move with the sound of birdsong).

This is a superior piece of theatre, highly recommended.  It runs until December this year.


The Threepenny Opera (National Theatre)

This new translation of the Bertolt Brecht-Kurt Weill has been polarising audiences at the National Theatre, but it is a vibrant and lively production, entertaining and bawdy, and – some diction issues aside – a well-sung musical black comedy.  I’m pleased to report that Weill’s music has definitely stood the test of time.

Rory Kinnear (showing versatility with fairly successful vocal work) is Captain Macheath aka Mack the Knife, who carries round a large blade and dispatches people who cause him trouble.  He marries Polly Peachum (Rosalie Craig, last seen in the dreadful wonder.land, much better here) for her brains and to get one over on her gangster dad and her horny mum. But is his chequered past about to catch up with him?

threepennyopera

This production, by Rufus Norris, uses a translation by Simon Stephens which focuses on a run of profanity and the ‘filthy language’ promised in the National’s publicity, alongside the ‘immoral behaviour’ which includes Mackie and Polly making their first appearance in coitus which being lowered down from the flies on a crescent moon.

Brechtian theatre shows all the nuts and bolts of the stage, and this production doesn’t disappoint, with lights, ropes, and a busy set of steps, paper doors, and liberal use of the National’s drum revolve, all contributing to the overall effect.

There are some aspects of this musical that are muddled: Haydn Gwynne’s Mrs Peachum using a fire extinguisher to mimic vomiting after a heavy night, all of Sharon Small’s songs as heavily Scots-accented Jenny, some of the lyric changes, the gay angle, and Peachum’s wig, but they are generally overshadowed by successful innovations, including Paule Constable’s lighting design.

Debbie Kurup does well as a feisty and aggressive Lucy Brown, and George Ikediashi is a camp balladeer, but Peter de Jersey disappoints in the duet with Kinnear (‘A Soldier’s Return’) and I struggled with one of Mackie’s gang being severely disabled and almost played for laughs.

Edit: I would like to expand on my final sentence following a comment I have received on Twitter, specifically honing in on the fact I had a problem following the speech of the member of the cast with cerebral palsy (his name is Jamie Beddard, and he plays the member of Mackie’s gang called ‘The Shadow’).

The Telegraph’s review claims that this casting was inspired and makes the audience implicit in Macheath’s eventual frustration and mockery, but for me this didn’t work.  I was frustrated enough with not being able to follow the lyrics at times without having to decipher a speech impairment as well; nonetheless, Beddard did well and was particularly amusing in the black scene where Polly, the new bride, seems in danger of a nasty assault from the gang.

I am afraid, though, that I felt this particular piece of casting was a stunt which did not work in the context of the whole musical, and it weakened the fabric of a show which was already not entirely successful, by overbalancing scenes and musical numbers with an additional burden on an audience who were already dealing with an assault on the senses from the revised lyrics and situations, and could do nothing but react with uncomfortable laughter.  I hope this makes my comment clearer.

 


Young Chekhov: Platonov (National Theatre)

David Hare’s adaptations of Chekhov’s early plays is presented at the National Theatre as single plays as well as a day-long trilogy, but having seen both ‘Ivanov’ and ‘The Seagull’ before, I chose to go on Saturday morning to see ‘Platonov’.

platonov

A difficult play to characterize, Chekhov wrote his first play in 1881 as a large-scale, eight-hour untitled piece, but it was never staged.  This is the play which eventually became came known as ‘Platonov” (as well as being adapted under titles as different as ‘Wild Honey’, ‘Unfinished Piece for Mechanical Piano’, ‘Firework on the James’, ‘Don Juan’ and ‘A Country Scandal’).  It was adapted for television under the present title, starring Rex Harrison, in 1971.

We meet the group who are the main characters in this drama in the garden of Anna Petrovna (Nina Sosanya), including doctor Nikolai and his wife Maria, his sister Sasha and her husband Platonov (interestingly only he is referred to by his last name from all the younger members of the group).  Anna’s stepson Sergei is bringing back his young bride, Sofya, but she and Platonov share a past.   In the meantime rich landowner Porfiri loves Anna and seeks her hand, but his feckless son Kiril has other ideas.

This play has moments of laugh out loud comedy, melodrama, financial skullduggery, adultery, and eventual tragedy, but the whole is an uneasy mix.  In the title role, James McArdle, in broad Scots accent, gives the role of a heel, a drunk and a rotter some humanity, although I found Olivia Vinall’s Sofya a little on the hysterical side.

As Anna, Nina Sosanya is graceful yet playful, and the rich man who wishes to call in his loans, Pavel, is played with gleeful malice by David Verrey.  Joshua James’ sniffy and sarcastic Nikolai is fun, while Jade Williams’ Sasha has the right mix of naive wife and distraught mother, and Nicholas Day’s red-faced Colonel is nicely comical.

Even though the programme states these plays are ‘new versions by David Hare, this particular adaptation of ‘Platonov’ was first staged in the West End in 2001.  This set of plays are directed by Jonathan Kent for the Chichester Festival, and running at the National Theatre into early October 2016.

 

 


Deep Purple studio albums revisited – part one

I’ll open this look back across the studio output of Deep Purple with a disclaimer: I have not followed the band with any interest for the past twenty years, so I will not be discussing the most recent four albums by the band.

The live and compilation albums, too, are out of scope of this post.

Instead I will look at the relative merits and demerits of the fifteen studio albums between ‘Shades of Deep Purple’ in 1968 to ‘Purpendicular’ in 1996.

Mark One

  • Vocals – Rod Evans
  • Guitar – Ritchie Blackmore
  • Bass – Nick Simper
  • Keyboards – Jon Lord
  • Drums – Ian Paice

This line-up produced three studio albums in 1968 and 1969.  Their sound was closer to the pop and psychedelic sound of the time than anything approaching heavy metal/hard rock.  This being said, Evans was an excellent singer whose work on covers of The Beatles’ ‘Help’ and ‘We Can Work It Out’, Neil Diamond’s ‘Kentucky Woman’, Joe South’s ‘Hush’, and Ike and Tina Turner’s ‘River Deep, Mountain High’ has worn well over the years.  Original material which stands out from this period includes ‘Shield’, ‘Lalena’, ‘Blind’, ‘April’, ‘Why Didn’t Rosemary’ and ‘Mandrake Root’.

The albums

‘Shades of Deep Purple’, released July 1968 (US), September 1968 (UK)

  • And The Address (instrumental)
  • Hush
  • One More Rainy Day
  • Happiness/I’m So Glad
  • Mandrake Root
  • Help
  • Love Help Me
  • Hey Joe

High point: ‘Hush’.  This was the band’s first single and filmed footage from the time shows how full of energy they already were.

Low point: The album doesn’t hang together as a whole and often feels like a random grab-bag of material.  ‘I’m So Glad’ suffers from poor lyrics and repetitive melodies.

Marks out of five: two and a half.

‘The Book of Taliesyn’, released October 1968 (US), June 1969 (UK)

  • Listen, Learn, Read On
  • Wring That Neck (instrumental)
  • Kentucky Woman
  • Exposition/We Can Work It Out
  • Shield
  • Anthem
  • River Deep, Mountain High

High point: An accomplished album with a more assured feel, but ‘Kentucky Woman’ and ‘Shield’ are my favourite cuts.

Low point: I never quite warmed to ‘Listen, Learn, Read On’ with its constant refrain referencing the album’s title.

Marks out of five: four.

‘Deep Purple’, released June 1969 (US), November 1969 (UK)

  • Chasing Shadows
  • Blind
  • Lalena
  • Fault Line/The Painter
  • Why Didn’t Rosemary
  • Bird Has Flown
  • April

High point: ‘April’ is lengthy, and beautiful, and wonderful.  But ‘Lalena’ is a sweet ballad.

Low point: I could live without ‘Fault Line’.

Marks out of five: three and a half.

Mark Two

  • Vocals – Ian Gillan
  • Guitar – Ritchie Blackmore
  • Bass – Roger Glover
  • Keyboards – Jon Lord
  • Drums – Ian Paice

This line-up was the most commercially successful, releasing four studio albums between 1970 and 1973.  This period showcased their change of style to hard rock with the addition of their new vocalist, screamer Ian Gillan.  His chemistry with guitarist Ritchie Blackmore was a high point of this line-up’s work, especially live (which is another story, another blog post).

The albums

‘Deep Purple in Rock’, released June 1970

  • Speed King
  • Bloodsucker
  • Child in Time
  • Flight of the Rat
  • Into the Fire
  • Living Wreck
  • Hard Lovin’ Man

High point: ‘Child in Time’ is an epic, glorious piece of music.  And it isn’t the heaviest track on the album.

Low point: This album has not aged well at all.  Gillan’s histrionics now seem false and fake, although I have a soft spot for ‘Speed King’ and ‘Living Wreck’.

Marks out of five: two.

‘Fireball’, released July 1971 (US), September 1971 (UK)

  • Fireball
  • No No No
  • Demon’s Eye
  • Anyone’s Daughter
  • The Mule
  • Fools
  • No One Came

High point: Gillan’s vocal work on this album is superb, especially on ‘Demon’s Eye’.

Low point: ‘No One Came’ sounds rushed these days.

Marks out of five: three.

‘Machine Head’, released March 1972

  • Highway Star
  • Maybe I’m a Leo
  • Pictures of Home
  • Never Before
  • Smoke on the Water
  • Lazy
  • Space Truckin’

High point: The first great Deep Purple album.  Wall to wall excellence.

Low point: There isn’t one.  Honestly, this is the peak.

Marks out of five: five.

‘Who Do We Think We Are’, released January 1973 (US), February 1973 (UK)

  • Woman from Tokyo
  • Mary Long
  • Super Trouper
  • Smooth Dancer
  • Rat Bat Blue
  • Place in Line
  • Our Lady

High point: This was the beginning of the end for the line-up as both Gillan and Glover would be gone from the band by the end of 1973, but the cracks just don’t show.  ‘Mary Long’ is subversive, ‘Rat Bat Blue’ sparkles, and ‘Smooth Dancer’ is delightfully playful.

Low point: ‘Our Lady’ goes on a bit, but that’s a small quibble.

Marks out of five: four and a half.

Mark Three

  • Vocals – David Coverdale
  • Guitar – Ritchie Blackmore
  • Bass – Glenn Hughes
  • Keyboards – Jon Lord
  • Drums – Ian Paice

With new blood in the shape of Redcar-born David Coverdale and Cannock-born Glenn Hughes, the band’s direction took a blues and soul feel, which reached its apex with their appearance at 1974’s ‘California Jam’.

The albums

‘Burn’, released February 1974

  • Burn
  • Might Just Take Your Life
  • Lay Down, Stay Down
  • Sail Away
  • You Fool No One
  • What’s Goin’ On Here
  • Mistreated
  • ‘A’ 200 (instrumental)

High point: ‘Lay Down, Stay Down’ and ‘Sail Away’ are the best cuts on this.

Low point: This is just a disappointing and flat album overall, despite having ‘Mistreated’ on it.  That track would just blossom live when Coverdale hit his blues stride.

Marks out of five: two and a half.

‘Stormbringer’, released November 1974

  • Stormbringer
  • Love Don’t Mean a Thing
  • Holy Man
  • Hold On
  • Lady Double Dealer
  • You Can’t Do It Right
  • High Ball Shooter
  • The Gypsy
  • Soldier of Fortune

High point: Blackmore’s guitar work throughout this, especially on ‘Hold On’.  And ‘Soldier of Fortune’, probably Coverdale’s best studio vocal performance.

Low point: ‘You Can’t Do It Right’.

Marks out of five: four.

Mark Four

  • Vocals – David Coverdale
  • Guitar – Tommy Bolin
  • Bass – Glenn Hughes
  • Keyboards – Jon Lord
  • Drums – Ian Paice

Drugs and another turn of fortune into funk makes this far from a typical Deep Purple album, and this line-up’s life was truncated by the death of Bolin in 1976.

The album

‘Come Taste The Band’, released October 1975

  • Comin’ Home
  • Lady Luck
  • Gettin’ Tighter
  • Dealer
  • I Need Love
  • Drifter
  • Love Child
  • This Time Around/Owed to G
  • You Keep On Moving

High point: ‘You Keep On Moving’ and ‘Lady Luck’.

Low point: A dull album without much life or thought.

Marks out of five: one and a half.

 

 

 

 


Jaime Rebanal's Film Thoughts

Cinema - moving around life one film at a time.

The Case for Jeanette and Nelson

"Whaddya gonna do? I love her. I think she loves me." -Nelson Eddy on the Jack Parr Show, 1960

STARDUST AND SHADOWS

Opinions on Classic Hollywood , B Movies, Grindhouse, SF film , Classic Horror, Film Noir, Books, and related subjects by Canadian film guy TERRY SHERWOOD. (This site is not affiliated with author Charles Foster and his book Stardust and Shadows.)

The Wonderful World of Cinema

This blog is all about cinema, movies and stars of every decades. It's wonderful!

Movie classics

Thoughts on older movies, especially those from the 1930s to 1950s.

Hiss and Tell

Featuring Gryff, the angry diabetic cat, and the humans who serve him

TESSA BARRIE'S LOST BLOGS

Random Blogger from Jersey, Channel Islands, UK. Not Noo Jersey. Expect the Unexpected. Life is too short to be niche.

[insert title here]

just one of many things i'm still trying to figure out

buchanblog

A trip down Memorex lane

The Phantom Frame

Information about the creative works of Gareth Preston

West End Blog

Bringing you independent, honest, experienced reviews of current theatre shows. We believe theatre is something truly magical and can be enjoyed by everyone.

Archive Television Musings

"To waste one second of one's life is a betrayal of one's self! I wonder what's on television?"

The Actor's Advocate

In defence of acting

Ritchie Blackmores Rainbow

Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow - the ultimate resource

So much content, so little time...

Just another review blog

The Film Colony ♛

with Alicia Mayer

Spectacular Attractions

film in all its forms

Mingled Yarns

Anyone who says they have only one life to live must not know how to read a book

The Play's The Thing

Thoughts on theatre, scribblings on the stage, commentaries on culture.

Jaime Rebanal's Film Thoughts

Cinema - moving around life one film at a time.

The Case for Jeanette and Nelson

"Whaddya gonna do? I love her. I think she loves me." -Nelson Eddy on the Jack Parr Show, 1960

STARDUST AND SHADOWS

Opinions on Classic Hollywood , B Movies, Grindhouse, SF film , Classic Horror, Film Noir, Books, and related subjects by Canadian film guy TERRY SHERWOOD. (This site is not affiliated with author Charles Foster and his book Stardust and Shadows.)

The Wonderful World of Cinema

This blog is all about cinema, movies and stars of every decades. It's wonderful!

Movie classics

Thoughts on older movies, especially those from the 1930s to 1950s.

Hiss and Tell

Featuring Gryff, the angry diabetic cat, and the humans who serve him

TESSA BARRIE'S LOST BLOGS

Random Blogger from Jersey, Channel Islands, UK. Not Noo Jersey. Expect the Unexpected. Life is too short to be niche.

[insert title here]

just one of many things i'm still trying to figure out

buchanblog

A trip down Memorex lane

The Phantom Frame

Information about the creative works of Gareth Preston

West End Blog

Bringing you independent, honest, experienced reviews of current theatre shows. We believe theatre is something truly magical and can be enjoyed by everyone.

Archive Television Musings

"To waste one second of one's life is a betrayal of one's self! I wonder what's on television?"

The Actor's Advocate

In defence of acting

Ritchie Blackmores Rainbow

Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow - the ultimate resource

So much content, so little time...

Just another review blog

The Film Colony ♛

with Alicia Mayer

Spectacular Attractions

film in all its forms

Mingled Yarns

Anyone who says they have only one life to live must not know how to read a book

The Play's The Thing

Thoughts on theatre, scribblings on the stage, commentaries on culture.

%d bloggers like this: