Tag Archives: katherine jenkins

Katherine Jenkins (Barbican Centre)

This was the last date of Katherine Jenkins’ ‘Celebration’ tour, but with the Christmas carols dropped and a new guest performer in John Owen-Jones.

I am not much of a fan of Jenkins and her light classical crossover warbling, although taken purely as an entertainment her show certainly seems to please her hardcore fans of men of a certain age and their wives.

‘Santa Baby’ added a sprinkle of fun, and three dress changes and a crystal encrusted microphone gave a dash of glamour: there was strong accompaniment from the London Concert Orchestra conducted by Anthony Inglis (Die Fledermaus and Sleigh Bells opening both halves of the show).

In anticipation of the upcoming ENO production of ‘Carousel’ in which Jenkins makes her musical theatre debut in April, she treated us to a stirring ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’, while more traditional repertoire included an Italian translation of Dolly Parton’s ‘I Will Always Love You’ and ‘Sanctus’ (to the melody of Elgar’s Nimrod).

John Owen-Jones is always a solid proposition, having served long stints in the musicals ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ and ‘Les Miserables’, and we heard a song from each plus one from the underrated ‘Love Never Dies’, the lovely ‘Maria’ from ‘West Side Story’, one from ‘Miss Saigon’ (with a slight lyric fluff), and even the Eurovision winner from Conchita Wurst a couple of years ago, ‘Rise Like a Phoenix’.  

A duet of ‘Barcelona’ with Jenkins didn’t really work though, and she shone most convincingly in anthems like ‘Amazing Grace’ and ‘How Great Thou Art’.


Concert review: Katherine Jenkins

Katherine Jenkins is a big favourite of my husband’s, so we went along to see her at Hammersmith’s HMV Apollo on Thursday night (incidentally the Apollo is a former Gaumont cinema and still boasts many original features in an auditorium that escaped sub-division in its screening days, including a vast foyer space and period lighting).

Jenkins is a crossover artist, which means she sings both opera and contemporary songs.  Muddy sound blighted her opening song ‘Your Silhouette’ (a rather oddly ranged song about a relationship break-up), and we were also treated to the theme of the evening, veiled references to her own personal romantic problems as she split with her partner just before the start of the tour.

Opera numbers fared rather well, although it is hard to judge the depth of a voice which is amplified by microphones; still, the ‘Carmen Gypsy Dance’, ‘Filles de Cadiz’, and the numbers from Kismet (‘And This Is My Beloved’) and Phantom of the Opera (‘All I Ask Of You’, nicely sung in duet with American new boy Nathan Pacheco) came across with some emotional punch.

From her most recent album, Daybreak, the songs ‘Ancora Non Sai’ (a pleasing waltz) and ‘Black is the Colour’ (a folk number I associate most with Christy Moore) were excellent – the radio-friendly number ‘Break it to My Heart’ less so.  And if I had one wish I would have Jenkins drop her rendition of Leonard Cohen’s ‘Hallelujah’ as it quite painful to hear a complex song reduced to a simple pop ditty by a singer who doesn’t understand it!

After the interval we were treated to a comic interlude with questions and pointers from the audience (including a teenager who wanted to treat Jenkins to her ‘favourite pasty’ in Greggs, and a family who dedicated ‘Time to Say Goodbye’ to their ninety-year-old father).  And indeed, this was the song which ended a concert which clearly pleased her fans, but is unlikely to win any new converts.

Crossover artists are generally safe propositions who perform in overpriced shows (tickets here were an average price of £60) – and her special guest Nathan Pacheco is no exception, entertaining with the usual tenor fare of ‘Funiculi Funicular’ and ‘Nessun Dorma’, giving a good stab at ‘Danny Boy’, but coming a bit unstuck with ‘Caruso’ (which is perhaps forever associated with Pavarotti).


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is there room for me to sew?

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The Case for Jeanette and Nelson

"Whaddya gonna do? I love her. I think she loves me." -Nelson Eddy on the Jack Parr Show, 1960

STARDUST AND SHADOWS

Opinions on Classic Hollywood , B Movies, Grindhouse, SF film , Classic Horror, Film Noir, Books, and related subjects by Canadian film guy TERRY SHERWOOD. (This site is not affiliated with author Charles Foster and his book Stardust and Shadows.)

The Wonderful World of Cinema

This blog is all about cinema, movies and stars of every decades. It's wonderful!

Movie classics

Thoughts on older movies, especially those from the 1930s to 1950s.

Hiss and Tell

Featuring Gryff, the angry diabetic cat, and the humans who serve him

TESSA BARRIE'S LOST BLOGS

Random Blogger from Jersey, Channel Islands, UK. Not Noo Jersey, USA. Expect the unexpected. Life's too short to be niche.

[insert title here]

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West End Blog

Bringing you independent, honest, experienced reviews of current theatre shows. We believe theatre is something truly magical and can be enjoyed by everyone.

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So much content, so little time...

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